The Benefits of Maintaining a Teachable Spirit

By Devi Titus

 

Practical wisdom for living is the central theme of the book of Proverbs. The writings in this book are a collection of several authors dating back to the 10th century before Christ. However, most of the writings are attributed to King Solomon. These are timeless truths that will guide us to happiness and wholeness.

You will see a stark contrast presented between the benefits of those who seek wisdom and the pitfalls of those seeking a fool's life: The path of the righteous is like the light of dawn, which shines brighter and brighter until the full day. The way of the fool is like a deep darkness; they do not know over what they stumble (Prov. 4:8-9).

We know that the "fear of the Lord is the beginning of knowledge; fools despise wisdom and instruction" (Prov. 1:7).

I want to ask you one question. Are you teachable? Or do you despise it when others tell you what they think you should do? Do you seek instruction from others? Do you have a desire to "know" so you can be right and tell others how much you know, or do you desire to learn from others so their knowledge invested in you can lead you to be a better person—a person of wisdom?

There is a big difference between the two postures for learning. There is one essential quality for living practical Christian principles—principles that lead you to peace, prosperity, and healthy living. We must be teachable. The pitfall of a fool is to be wise in his own eyes—unteachable.

A teachable person is non-defensive. When they are wrong they quickly admit their wrongdoing and seek to learn how to be better next time. A teachable person allows others to speak truths learned from experience into their lives. A teachable person does not make unilateral decisions but seeks wisdom and knowledge from multiple people. A teachable person seeking wisdom has the fear of the Lord in their lives, fearing only to be a fool. A teachable person gains wisdom and abandons foolish decisions. A teachable person will drive out rebellion. Wisdom and rebellion do not coexist.

"The fear of the Lord is the beginning of wisdom and the knowledge of the Holy One is insight" (Prov. 9:10).

Continue to pursue "knowledge of the Holy One" and gain discernment or insight. With discernment and without rebellion, you can never be deceived. Do a self-inventory. Have you made major decisions without seeking instruction from others who are closest to you? Often it is easier to ask people you do not know rather than submitting your will to the wise counsel of people who really know you.

My desire for you is that you will become a seeker of wisdom through knowledge and the fear of the Lord.

Devi Titus